Scientific Shadow Drawing

Submitted by admin on Tue, 02/08/2022 - 15:46

Scientific Shadow Drawing

February 8, 2022
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Scientific Shadow Drawing SVMoA Classroom Enrichment Project

Students explore earth science concepts through observation of shadows and how they change over time, thus observing and recording the sun’s path across the sky as the earth rotates each day.

Students will draw each other’s shadows and compare/contrast the shadow to the actual person. Students will then create a still life collection and draw the shadows of their collection repeatedly every five to seven minutes to capture their shadow data and show evidence of the earth’s rotation as the sun moves across the sky.


Objectives:

  • Students will demonstrate contour drawing.
  • Students will create a composition using a collection of objects to cast a shadow. 
  • Students will observe and mark the path of the sun through a shadow drawing activity.
  • Students will demonstrate understanding of how shadows change over time.
  • Students will discuss how the sun moves across the sky because of the earth’s rotation.
  • Students will write a three-to-four sentence statement about their artwork.

Basic Lesson Outline:

  • Introduce the project and share slideshow.
  • Students will be shown a demonstration of a contour drawing. Students will trace each other’s shadows. Discuss how the shadow differs from the person, how the shadow changes over time and why.
  • Students are invited to choose four to five different colored pencils and are reminded to use one color to trace all of the shadows of their still life. Students use a new color for each iteration of shadow drawing. Students begin their own drawing.
  • Students will finalize their drawing, add texture and color, and create an artist’s statement.
  • Students display their work and artist statement, give feedback and discuss. 

Art Supplies:

  • drawing boards and clips
  • pencils and erasers
  • drawing paper
  • colored pencils (variety of colors)

Other Resources:

  • Example of shadow drawing created by SVMoA staff
  • Slideshow to introduce project, related artwork and concepts
  • Objects for still life collection (students bring objects in to class)

Idaho State Learning Standards:

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

  • VA:Cr2.1.6a: Demonstrate openness in trying new ideas, materials, methods, and approaches in making works of art and design.

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.

  • VA:Cr2.2.6a: Explain environmental implications of conservation, care, and clean-up of art materials, tools, and equipment.
  • VA:Cr2.3.6a: Design or redesign objects, places, or systems that meet the identified needs of diverse users.

Science Goal 2.1: Analyze the spatial organizations of people, places, and environment on the earth’s surface.
Objective(s): By the end of Geography-Western Hemisphere, the student will be able to:

  • 6-9.GWH.2.1.1: Explain and use the components of maps, compare different map projections, and explain the appropriate uses for each.
  • 6-9.GWH.2.1.2: Apply latitude and longitude to locate places on Earth and describe the uses of technology, such as Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Academic Language:

  • Subject area language: observe, notate/record, evidence, sun’s path/earth’s rotation, perspective, latitude
  • Art language: color, line, contour, pattern, repetition, shape, movement, perspective, positive and negative space, composition

Student Use of Vocabulary:

Students will use the words when creating their drawings, when writing about their work, and when discussing their projects.


Student Grouping:

Students will work independently.


 


 

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Inventing for the Future—Science Sculptures

Submitted by admin on Fri, 01/14/2022 - 14:54

Inventing for the Future—Science Sculptures

January 14, 2022
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Inventing for the Future—Science Sculptures

In this project, students explore 8th-grade science concepts involving adaptations.

We will discuss as a class how the environment is changing and what adaptations or inventions may be needed in the future. Students will consider issues like forest fires, rising temperatures, clean water, pollution, the food supply chain, etc. They will then sculpt a model of their invention or adaptation. Students will use materials like cardboard, paperboard, plastic containers and lids to construct their models. Students will learn to translate their 2D sketch into a 3D model.


Objectives:

  • Students will brainstorm at least three different ideas of possible adaptations or inventions that could help humans in the future
  • Students will determine which idea they will pursue
  • Students will fully draw their idea from two different angles to get a better understanding of the objects full form (translation from 2D to 3D).
  • Students will sculpt a 3D model of their adaptation.
  • Students will write a three-to-four sentence statement about their artwork

Basic Lesson Outline:

  • Introduce the project and share slideshow.
  • Students will determine their adaptation/invention and draw it from two different angles to better understand its form (translate from 2D to 3D)
  • Students will begin sculpting their idea
  • Students finalize their sculptures
  • Students display their work and artist statement, give feedback and discuss

Art Supplies:

  • extra blank paper for drawing idea from two angles
  • pencils and erasers
  • scissors
  • Xacto knives
  • cardboard pieces and paperboard pieces
  • masking tape/duct tape
  • cardboard tape and sponges
  • hot glue sticks and gun
  • (encourage students to bring items from home to add to the supplies)

Other Resources:

PowerPoint slideshow
Brainstorming worksheet
Final drawing worksheet


Idaho State Learning Standards:

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

  • VA:Cr1.1.8a: Document early stages of the creative process visually and/or verbally in traditional or new media.

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.

  • VA:Cr2.1.8a: Demonstrate willingness to experiment, innovate, and take risks to pursue ideas, forms, and meanings that emerge in the process of artmaking or designing.

Science Objective(s):

  • MS-LS2-4. Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.
  • MS-LS2-1. Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
  • MS-LS2-5. Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services.    

Academic Language:

  • Subject area language: adaptation, invention, environment, observation
  • Art Language: sculpture, form, 2D, 3D, model

Student Use of Vocabulary:

Students will use the words when creating their sculptures, when writing about their work, and when discussing their projects.


Student Grouping:

Students will work independently.


 


 

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Environmental Found Object Sculpture

Submitted by admin on Fri, 01/14/2022 - 14:32

Environmental Found Object Sculpture

January 14, 2022
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Environmental Found Object Sculpture

Students explore environmental science concepts through their exploration of the local environment.

Students will use found objects that are often discarded and repurpose them to create a found object sculpture. Key concepts surrounding this project are single-use and disposable items and their impact on the environment, recycling and repurposing. Students are asked to sculpt a form that communicates a message about the environment. 


Objectives:

  • Students will learn about sculpture, found object sculpture and assemblage as art forms
  • Students will design a composition that communicates a message about the environment
  • Students will choose the found objects, form and color scheme of their sculptural piece in an effort to help communicate their desired message
  • Students will construct a found object sculpture that communicates a message about the environment
  • Students will write a two-to-three sentence statement about their piece, the objects used and the message they are communicating

Basic Outline of the Lesson:

  • Using the slideshow, introduce the Project and show examples of sculpture, found object sculpture and assemblage. Discuss the differences & similarities
  • Students begin brainstorming/sketching ideas
  • Students collect found objects (during class and outside of class)
  • Students begin sculpting
  • Students continue sculpting
  • Students complete sculptures, title their work and write an artist statement
  • Students display their sculptures, artist statement, give feedback and discuss

Art Supplies:

  • found objects
  • adhesive
  • wire and/or string
  • spray paint
  • backer or base support board as needed

Other Resources:

  • Slideshow to introduce project, related artwork and concepts
  • Found objects (students find in and out of class, teacher provides some as well)

Technology:

Access to computer for viewing the PowerPoint slideshow.     


Idaho State Learning Standards:

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.

  • VA:Cr1.1.la: Use multiple approaches to begin creative endeavors
  • VA:Cr1.2.la: Shape an artistic investigation of an aspect of present-day life using a contemporary practice of art or design

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.

  • VA:Cr2.1.lla: Through experimentation, practice, and persistence, demonstrate acquisition of skills and knowledge in a chosen art form
  • VA:Cr2.3.llla: Demonstrate in works of art or design how visual and material culture defines, shapes, enhances, inhibits, and/or empowers people's lives

ESS3.C: Human Impact on Earth Systems:

  • Though the magnitudes of human impacts are greater than they have ever been, so too are human abilities to model, predict, and manage current and future impacts. (ESS3-HS-5)

Academic Language:

  • Subject area language: human impact, environment, pollution, waste, ecosystem
  • Art language: found object, sculpture, assemblage, disparate, form, color scheme

Student Use of Vocabulary:

Students will use the words when creating their sculptures, when writing about their work in their artist statement, and when discussing their projects.


Student Grouping:

Students will work independently.


 


 

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Data Sculptures—Visually Representing Data

Submitted by admin on Fri, 01/14/2022 - 13:39

Data Sculptures—Visually Representing Data

January 14, 2022
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Data Sculptures: Visually Representing Data

Students will explore 7th-grade science concepts by studying weather data and learning how to translate that data into a three-dimensional sculpture.

Different data sets include snowfall, river levels, fire data, etc. Students will assign a color and a shape or form to each different piece of data. They will then sculpt each type of data using paper sculpture techniques. When finished, students will have a sculpture that communicates their chosen weather data visually.


Objectives:

  • Students will explore a variety of weather-related data sets
  • Students will identify color, shape and form as elements of art
  • Students will translate their chosen weather data into visual representations of color, shape and form 
  • Students will demonstrate a variety of paper sculpting techniques 
  • Students will write a three-to-four sentence statement about their artwork

Basic Lesson Outline:

  • Introduce the Project and share slideshow
  • Students will review and select their data set
  • Students finalize their data translation plan on brainstorming worksheet
  • Students are introduced to a variety of paper sculpting techniques and begin sculpting
  • Students will be introduced to a variety of attachment techniques and continue sculpting
  • Students display their work and artist statement, give feedback and discuss

Art Supplies:

  • Pencils and erasers
  • colored pencils
  • paper in various colors
  • grocery bags to hold sculpted pieces in between days
  • scissors
  • glue sticks
  • heavy paper to mount sculpture (cardstock)

Other Resources:

  • PowerPoint slideshow
  • Brainstorming worksheet

Idaho State Learning Standards:

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work

  • VA:Cr2.1.7a: Demonstrate persistence in developing skills with various materials, methods, and approaches in creating works of art or design
  • VA:Cr2.3.7a: Apply visual organizational strategies to design and produce a work of art, design, or media that clearly communicates information or ideas

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work

  • VA:Cr3.1.7a: Reflect on and explain important information about personal artwork in an artist statement or another format

Science Objective: Analyze and interpret data on natural hazards to forecast future catastrophic events and inform the development of technologies to mitigate their effects


Academic Language:

  • Subject area language: data, data set, weather, observation, translation, variables
  • Art Language: Sculpture, form, shape, color, 2D, 3D

Student Use of Vocabulary:

Students will use the words when creating their sculptures, when writing about their work, and when discussing their projects.


Student Grouping:

Students could work in pairs or independently.


 


 

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Mega Molecules—Scientific Sculptures

Submitted by admin on Wed, 03/04/2020 - 15:36

Mega Molecules—Scientific Sculptures

March 2, 2020
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Mega Molecules Art Integration Lesson Plan - Sun Valley Museum of Art

Small groups of students choose a molecule.

Then, individually, students create the elements of the molecule compound using paper manipulation techniques including kirigami and quilling. The individual elements are then combined into one sculpture to create the compound.


Objectives:

  • Students will create an element
  • Students will work together to create a molecule
  • Students will present their work to the class
  • Students will write an artist’s statement

Basic Outline of the Lesson:

  • Introduce of the project
  • Introduce the materials and let students experiment with them
  • Students create sculptures
  • In small groups, students combine sculptures to create molecules
  • Students present their molecules
  • Students write their artist’s statements

Art Supplies:

  • Miscellaneous colored paper
  • Miscellaneous colored card stock
  • Pencils / erasers
  • Rulers
  • Cutting boards
  • X-ACTO knives / blades
  • Scissors
  • Glue sticks
  • Hot glue guns / glue gun sticks
  • Tape
  • Drawing paper
  • Tag board for presenting molecules

Other Resources:

  • Examples of paper sculptures and how to manipulate paper (kirigami and quilling)
  • Molecule list
  • Slide show to introduce project and related artwork (see outline at the end of the lesson plan)

Mega Molecules Art Integration Lesson Plan - Sun Valley Museum of Art


Idaho State Learning Standards:

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 4: Convey meaning through the presentation/performance/production of an original work or unique interpretation of a work.

  • Objective PR1.1 Combine knowledge and understanding from two or more disciplines to present/perform their original or interpreted works for an audience
  • Objective PR1.2 Convey meaning through their presentation/performance

Physical Sciences: PS1-MS Matter and Its Interactions

  • PS1–MS–1: Develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.
    Further Explanation: Emphasis is on developing models of molecules that vary in complexity. Examples of simple molecules could include ammonia and methanol. Examples of extended structures could include sodium chloride or diamonds. Examples of molecular-level models could include drawings, 3D ball and stick structures, or computer representations showing different molecules with different types of atoms.
  • PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter
    Substances are made from different types of atoms, which combine with one another in various ways. Atoms form molecules that range in size from two to thousands of atoms. (PS1-MS-1)

Academic Language:

  • Subject area language: atom, compound, molecule
  • Art language: paper manipulation, quilling, kirigami

Student Use of Vocabulary:

Students will use the words when creating their projects, presenting their molecules and writing their artist statements


Student Grouping:

Students will work in small groups and individually


Mega Molecules Art Integration Lesson Plan - Sun Valley Museum of Art

 


Funding for this lesson plan was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services [MA-10-19-0563-19].
Additional funding provided by Wendy and Alan Pesky.

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A River Runs Through It—A Watershed Art installation

Submitted by admin on Mon, 03/02/2020 - 12:39

A River Runs Through It—A Watershed Art installation

March 2, 2020
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A River Runs Through It-Watershed Art Installation

Students work together to create an art installation of a watershed.

Recycled plastic serves multiple purposes in this project: it is reusable, economical material; it reflects the plastic waste that is in our water; and it shows students how much plastic we consume. Students create part of a waterfall, a fish, and a plant while learning about the different components of a watershed, including human impact on a watershed.


Objectives:

  • Students will create elements of a watershed using recycled plastics
  • Students will identify elements of human impact on a watershed
  • Students will create an art installation representing a watershed

Basic Lesson Outline:

  • Introduce the project—slide show
  • Students create a waterfall, plants, and fish
  • The watershed is assembled in the installation location

Art Supplies:

  • Watercolor paints
  • Acrylic paints
  • Modge podge
  • Paint brushes
  • Water cups for brushes
  • Scissors
  • Plastic bottles
  • Caps
  • Tissue paper
  • Glitter paint
  • Colored masking tape
  • Stapler
  • Glue guns
  • Hot glue
  • Plastic film / plastic bags
  • Hemp line / fishing line
  • Thumb tacks
  • Dowel or rod to hang the bottles
  • Wire
  • Wire cutters
  • Eye screws
  • Rope
  • Colored pencils
  • Drawing paper

Other Resources:

  • Visual examples of fish and plants created from plastic
  • Slide show to introduce project and related artwork (see outline at the end of the lesson plan)

A River Runs Through It—A Watershed Art installation


Idaho State Learning Standards

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 4: Convey meaning through the presentation/performance/production of an original work or unique interpretation of a work

  • Objective PR1.1 Combine knowledge and understanding from two or more disciplines to present/perform their original or interpreted works for an audience
  • Objective PR1.2 Convey meaning through their presentation/performance

LS2-MS Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics

  • LS2-MS-1. Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
    Further Explanation: Emphasis is on cause and effect relationships between resources and growth of individual organisms and the numbers of organisms in ecosystems during periods of abundant and scarce resources
  • LS2-MS-3. Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem.
    Further Explanation: Emphasis is on describing the conservation of matter and flow of energy into and out of various ecosystems, and on defining the boundaries of the system
  • LS2-MS-6. Evaluate competing design solutions for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services
    Further Explanation: Examples of ecosystem services could include water purification, nutrient recycling, and prevention of soil erosion. Examples of design solution constraints could include scientific, economic, and social considerations.

Academic Language:

  • Subject area language: watershed
  • Art language: art installation

Student Use of Vocabulary:

Students will use the words when creating their projects


Student Grouping:

Students will work individually or in small groups


A River Runs Through It—A Watershed Art installation


Funding for this lesson plan was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services [MA-10-19-0563-19].
Additional funding provided by Wendy and Alan Pesky.

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Art Rocks—Earth Science Sculptures

Submitted by admin on Tue, 02/25/2020 - 22:37

Art Rocks—Earth Science Sculptures

February 26, 2020
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Lesson Plans

Students explore earth science, identifying rock types and their characteristics, including luster, formation, location, and density.

Sculptures of the rock are created using chicken wire, papier maché, paint, metallic paints, glitter glue, and tissue paper. To conclude the project students, will present their rock and introduce it to the class using a first-person monologue that explains the rock’s “story.”


Objectives:

  • Students will choose a rock and identify its type, luster, and composition
  • Students will create a 3D representation of their rock using materials provided
  • Students will calculate the rock’s density
  • Students will write and perform a monologue as a part of the project summary

Basic Lesson Outline:

  • Introductory slide show
  • Create sculptures
  • Write monologues
  • Present sculptures and monologues to the class

Art Supplies:

  • Chicken wire
  • Glue
  • Water
  • Tissue paper
  • Acrylic paint
  • Metallic paint
  • Glitter glue

Other Resources:

Slide show to introduce project and related artwork (see outline at the end of the lesson plan)


Idaho State Learning Standards

Arts and Humanities: Anchor Standard 4: Convey meaning through the presentation/performance/production of an original work or unique interpretation of a work.

  • Objective PR1.1: Combine knowledge and understanding from two or more disciplines to present/perform their original or interpreted works for an audience
  • Objective PR1: Convey meaning through their presentation/performance

ESS2-MS Earth’s Systems     

  • ESS2-MS-1: Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process. Further Explanation: Emphasis is on the processes of melting, crystallization, weathering, deformation, and sedimentation, which act together to form minerals and rocks through the cycling of Earth’s materials.

Academic Language:

  • Subject area language: crystal, luster, hardness, streak, density, cleavage, fracture, ore, metal, nonmetal, gemstone, rock, igneous rock, sedimentary rock, sediment, metamorphic rock, rock cycle, extrusive rock, intrusive rock, clastic rock, conglomerate, organic rock, chemical sedimentary rock, metamorphism
  • Art language: form, texture, color, space, pattern, sculpture, monologue, artist statement

Student Use of Vocabulary:

Students will use the words when creating their sculptures and in their final presentations


Student Grouping:

Students will work individually


 


Funding for this lesson plan was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services [MA-10-19-0563-19].
Additional funding provided by Wendy and Alan Pesky.

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